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is. i went from republicans to independents, to democrat. three reasons. number one, i want religion out of the party. i have a religion. that's my business. i have a political party. that's the political parties business. number two, women's issues. i don't personally believe in abortion, but i don't believe i have the rights tell my neighbor what they should do. i think the republican party needs to get out of people's bedrooms and back into the boardrooms. number three, the middle-class tax hikes their break-in instituted. we never recovered from that. to my city unions. all things that had middle-class workers. ending tax like state sales tax, all of these things it is strictly, so i know when it happened. it was in the reagan years. >> host: thanks, caller. >> guest: >> guest: a few republican come you a liberal one. undertake the supporters. she says she wants religion out of politics. i wonder she would've felt that way about the civil rights movement because it is actually martin luther king was not only a top her. he was also the reverend dr. martin luther king. the power of
-rights laws that prohibit firing, promoting and hiring based on race, age, national origin, religion, pregnancy, those immutable characteristics that we think are worthy of the protection of our civil rights laws. in most states there are modest exemptions to the employment at will dadoctrine, amount wrongful discharge. when an employer requires someone to break the law in order to keep their job. or if an employer is doing something that is in violation of a well-defined written public policy. other than that, we give employers in this country wi de latitude, because we have a free market economy, because we recognize the person that takes the risk and set up a business and puts their monetary and human capital into it, that they have rights to run their business the way they see fit. we are very, very reluctant to place any sort of restrictions on that. again, this is a small one. not saying that you have to hire anybody that is not fully qualified for your job. in essence, what these laws do rainout are saving employers from themselves, because if they are ignoring all of the unem
or the value of religion and i do think that's one of the reasons why president obama continues the tradition going his fifth he year here. there's something religiously for politicians it's a common language, trying to bridge the gap between themselves and a number of americans. we've heard president obama do that in past years in very real terms. we've learned things about him. last year we learned that he prays every day. he said he gets up in the morning, says a brief prayer and spends some time in scripture and devotion and obviously talking i think a lot in evangelical tones at the time you look at it in this event that, yes, it's not supposed to be a political event, but it was in an election year where a number of normally, i would say evangelical republican supporters had questions about mitt romney and you saw president obama maybe able to seize this moment, so i think sometimes it serves a political opportunity. sometimes it serves this sort of, serves as an opportunity for the president to reach out, and certainly at a time right now when he's dealing with some very divisive issue
of resistance to federal rule in new mexico. what is going on today with the rich and diverse bodies of religion in santa fe, but we constructed that on top of this foundation of faith being part of santa fe's history from the very start. santa fe has been the subject of many books by many writers, a diverse range of writers, and this book has a terrific bibliography for anyone who wants to read more about santa fe. >> and now more from santa fe, new mexico, home to about 80,000 people and 250 art galleries. santa fe boasts a rich historical and literary culture. with the help of our local cable partner, comcast, booktv takes a tour of collected works bookstore, one of santa fe's 17 independent bookstores. >> welcome to collected works bookstore and coffeehouse. we're in santa fe, new mexico. my name is dorothy massey, and my daughter and co-owner have owned collected works for the last 18 of its now 35 years old as santa fe's oldest and, we think, best in the city. santa fe has a population of 80,000 people, and it supports no less than 17 independent bookstores. how does collected works and th
's great religions. it is a feast for the eyes and millions of pilgrims have already arrived. a sea of humanity on india's ganges river. we've waited 12 years for this festival to come around again so we sent holly williams to witness the spectacle. >> reporter: from every corner of india and by every conceivable mode of transport pilgrims are making their way to prayag, the holiest place in the hindu world for the biggest celebration on the hindu calendar the maha kumbh mela held only once every 12 years. born by their shared faith, they come here to purify themselves by bathing in the ganges the river that nurtured india's 5 civilization. om kumar is a wheat farmer from central india who told us he walked 300 miles to get here. why did you come from so far away? he made the journey, he said because the water has special power. for hindus the ganges suzuki a sacred river and they believe that bathing here during the kumbh mela will wash away their signs. the pilgrims have set up camp in a sprawling city of tents complete with banks, its own police force and traffic jams. but on sun
, religion, etc. discrimination in the fact as opposed to judging the size of eggs or something, being discriminate. and so by giving it a name, it started to have its own life. the ability of a president to name something -- i'm jumping ahead a little bit. but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country the president in the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these testimonies which were sort of created by presidents, we think, are there from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist. he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had
about history, religion, politics. >> you don't love your child any less because they have a mental illness. you love them probably more. sometimes i think elliot was put here on earth for us just to see if we could make it through. >> i'm a good person. >> smart. >> smart and talented. >> beat dad on jeopardy. >> usually beat dad on jeopardy. >> a lot of memories in those books. >> misdiagnosed with add as a first grader. it took years for elliot to get the correct diagnosis. asasberger's syndrome. often repetitive behaviors. he also has a mental illness. psychosis, a loss of contact with reality. >> he actually went out to a dumpster, they were building a new home, and started banging his head on the dumpster. if that doesn't break your heart, i don't know what does. to see someone go through that and now to look at elliot. >> i was delusional. >> you were delusional, but you're doing so good now. >> there were years of heartbreak and struggle. he head butted his father and the family was forced to call 911. >> elliot was thrown to the ground by a police officer, shack
, immigration he said there's room but, look, republicans need to get religion on this. do you expect a similar tone in the state of the union? >> he has a limited amount of time. they feel they have a so-called m mandate from their victory not losing the senate. i think it's kind of full speed ahead for the president right now. he's going to go as bold as he can go, limited amount of time. i think i disagree a little bit on the economy. i think it's a course correction for him. i feel he's maybe second-guessing, not talking about the economy during his inaugural speech, now maybe i should have talked about that. >> which is fascinating because if you look at the first term in a lot of ways, you know, he started off -- you had a republican party that was largely kind of in the doldrums and he started off with economic stimulus and health care which united the party in some way. is he -- is he smart to refocus on the economy, jim? >> yes. >> and probably the more important question, is there actually -- we had angus king on saying there's common ground. is there common ground on big things? >> y
's been cloaked in secrecy and secrecy is the sacrosanct secular religion of this city. >> woodruff: so this has stirred it up? >> i think so, because of the leaked memo and the system, we are having a debate about drones. and i guess if i want a drone policy i want it run by a franciscan, not a jesuit. but he didn't really defend it, even, though. he didn't really go out there and say here is why we have to do it he saw the chairman of the committee senator feinstein try to brag an argument out of him. he was hesitant to go there because he wanted to add leer to secrecy. but because of the memo we're having the discussion. and it's being lead on the other side by the opponents ron and j rockefeller, people like that and so you know when i look at the evidence, one of the things you see is that people like barack obama who were opposed more or less are skeptical of the policy, once they are actually in in power faced with the realities you see them swing over and so it's become a f you think about if we are going to take on al qaeda, and i think the evidence is that it allows you to kil
as you would have them do unto you. all cultures and races and religions. >> is that him. >> he is not in the painting. that is a farmer that was a end from of his in vermont where he lived at the time. >> who is this over here. >> one of my favorites. you can almost taste the turkey. >> quintessential thanksgiving piece. done for a very serious purpose during world war ii to articulate president roosevelts four freedoms. freedom of speech, freedom from want. fear dom from fear and freedom to worship. these are the reasons america went into war to preserve these freedoms for people all over the world. >> he also made statements too, look at this. >> after he stopped working for the saturday evening post where he had done 321 magazine covers through the his lifetime went to work for look magazine. the subject matter changed greatly and he he started painting the current events of the day and did some very important civil rights movement paintings. this young girl is walking to school will protected by the u.s. marshals i want indicating the first elementary school in new orleans.
and the receipt. >> make themselves out to, you know, kind of be a jerk. but also play the religion card as an excuse. >> reporter: pastor elois bell was a party of ten eating at an applebees in st. louis. the pastor did not appreciate the automatic 18% gratuity charged to large groups, so she scrawled on the receipt, i give god 10%, why do you get 18% and signed it pastor. that was too much. and she posted it on reddit. >> i thought it was comically immature. >> reporter: but pastor bell wasn't laughing once the receipt went viral and posters started calling her -- >> you hypocrite pastor. >> reporter: chelsea wasn't serving that table. at the end of the night, she heard about the receipt from the actual server. >> the server calls me over and says you're not going to believe this? >> reporter: the 18% gratuity was taken directly out of the pastor's credit card. she wrote zero in the space for additional tip, but says -- >> and i put $6 on the table. >> reporter: when the "i give god 10%" receipt became news, the pastor called applebees to complain. >> that they wanted me fired, the ser
at the washington hilton for the official start of the national prayer breakfast. our religion correspondent lauren green live in our washington bureau. any big announcements this morning, lauren? >> reporter: jon, one surprise to many people, except the white house inner circle was the president's announcement his long time faith advisor would be leaving his post tomorrow. dubois is a young ministers whose face was not known to people outside of religious groups. he headed the president's faith based office. was buy by his side during the campaign and first term. dubois is known as the president's personal faith advisor. >> every morning he sends me, via e-mail, a daily meditation, a snippet of scripture, for me to reflect on, and it is meant the world to me and despite my pleas, tomorrow will be his last day in the white house. >> reporter: the president made no mention why dubois is leaving. not uncommon in second term for staff to do so. my sources say the white house will announce tomorrow where dubois is headed, jon? jon: did the president touch on policy at all in this breakfast? >> reporter
nationalities and all different religions and we should show the rest of the world how to behave. >> with reference to the nazis, what was that? >> well, he fought in the battle of the bulge. he's a war hero. so that's the reference. >> so the fact that he was obviously dramatically influenced by world war ii? >> exactly. >> and that's still part of your life right now. and that's what -- you see some connection with your experience -- >> well, violence has to be stopped. >> war is the lowest form of human behavior. killing is the worst form of -- you know, i just finished writing a book -- i'm not plugging it right now, but i wrote, life is a gift. we are blessed with being alive. we should enjoy it and enjoy our neighbors and help our cousins and relatives and friends, one another. we should all help one another. it's a gift. we have a gift with our lives. >> well, mr. bennett, danny, tony bennett, thank you both for coming in. if you won't sing, we're going to play some clips that we love to hear from you. >> i love this video. i love it. ♪ ♪ she gets to hungry for dinner
has many different parts. you can talk about economics, politics, religion, intellectual history, military history. but we can also talk about social history: race, class and gender are tops on that list. >>steve: so you looked at these two universities down in texas -- by the way, why did you pick texas and those two schools? >> texas handed us the opportunity. in 1971 it passed a law saying students had to take a europe american history and then in 2009 passed another law saying that the universities had to make the syllabi of their courses publicly available within three clicks of their main page. >>steve: so you could do investigating on your own. you did this study and you determined the instructors there are placing an awful lot of emphasis on race, class and gender. why? >> why? we think that is because they have been trained to do that, that the students coming out of the graduate schools in overwhelming numbers specialize in those areas, and also because they think they're doing good. they think that there is something wrong with america that needs to be fixed, and one
standing up against militants and terrorists, using our religion, for instance, as a mobilizing force. i think that drones as an instrument may have had some efficacy in terms of decisions, but we cannot allow us f-16's to come in. we use our own to run our anti- terror operations when we can, when we are able to move the population and protect them. drones are really -- we do not see them as productive at all. >> what would you tell the staff? what do you tell a member of the general staff? i think we are all on the same page now. members of the general staff and ourselves, where the future of this lies. pakistan has to take ownership of all anti-terror operations for them to be sustainable and to be seen as legitimate in the eyes of our people. you know, there have been a lot of drone strikes next door, and in any case you know that al qaeda, the whole -- through our cooperation and joint efforts, is pretty much degraded. that is something this administration will agree to also. >> james madison -- as british troops invaded the capital, she is known for saving eight portrait of george
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)